Cabernet Sauvignon

History in the World

“Lastly, Cabernet Sauvignon has found a terroir of preference in Chile, in the alluvial soils of Maipo river, deposited by the melting of the Andes glaciers.”

Cabernet Sauvignon is one of Bordeaux’s flagship grape varieties, as well as one of the most cultivated across the globe, and the raw material from which some of the greatest red wines are made, including the famous Château Mouton Rothschild and Château Latour. Originally of controversial origins, a team of researchers lead by Dr. Carole Meredith, from the University of California, Davis, through the use of DNA analysis found in 1996 that it was the result of the crossing between Cabernet Franc and Sauvignon Blanc.

It is primarily known in France and the rest of the world as Cabernet Sauvignon, although it can be sometimes called (or used to be called) by other names such as marchoupet, carbonet, bidure, Bouchet, Bouche, Petit Bouchet, Petit-Cabernet, Petit Vidure, Vidure, Sauvignon Rouge…

The Médoc region in Bordeaux, and Pauillac in particular, still remains as its home, where Château Mouton and Château d’Armailhac were the first to cultivate it and their vineyards are probably the origin of all other vineyards in other estates.

Nonetheless, it slowly gained a place in the Right Bank of Bordeaux, although still far behind Cabernet Franc and Merlot. Today, the Bordeaux region accounts for 60% of all Cabernet Sauvignon planted in France.

It’s been a long time since Cabernet Sauvignon crossed the French border and is now present all over the world. Some

places have achieved notoriety due to the quality of their Cabernet Sauvignon and their terroir perfectly suited for this grape.

In Tuscany, Italy, when blended with sangiovese, it gave rise to the Super Tuscans, especially in Bolgheri in the famous estates of Sassicaia and Ornellaia Ornellaia.

In California, the Cabernet Sauvignon from Napa Valley were the first to be renown and achieve a great reputation. In the now famous 1976 Judgment of Paris, the 1973 Cabernet Sauvignon from Stag’s Leap District in a blind tasting defeated the famous estates from the Left Bank such as Château Mouton-Rothschild, Château Montrose and Château Haut-Brion and put California on the map.

The grape has also been a success in Australia, thanks to the Coonawarra wine region and its famous “terra rossa”, red clayey soils formed by the erosion of limestone.

Lastly, Cabernet Sauvignon has found a terroir of preference in Chile, in the alluvial soils of Maipo river, deposited by the melting of the Andes glaciers.

Today, with close to 300,000 ha planted across the globe, Cabernet Sauvignon is the world’s most planted grape above Merlot and Pinot Noir.

places have achieved notoriety due to the quality of their Cabernet Sauvignon and their terroir perfectly suited for this grape.

In Tuscany, Italy, when blended with sangiovese, it gave rise to the Super Tuscans, especially in Bolgheri in the famous estates of Sassicaia and Ornellaia Ornellaia.

In California, the Cabernet Sauvignon from Napa Valley were the first to be renown and achieve a great reputation. In the now famous 1976 Judgment of Paris, the 1973 Cabernet Sauvignon from Stag’s Leap District in a blind tasting defeated the famous estates from the Left Bank such as Château Mouton-Rothschild, Château Montrose and Château Haut-Brion and put California on the map.

The grape has also been a success in Australia, thanks to the Coonawarra wine region and its famous “terra rossa”, red clayey soils formed by the erosion of limestone.

Lastly, Cabernet Sauvignon has found a terroir of preference in Chile, in the alluvial soils of Maipo river, deposited by the melting of the Andes glaciers.

Today, with close to 300,000 ha planted across the globe, Cabernet Sauvignon is the world’s most planted grape above Merlot and Pinot Noir.

History in Chile

In Chile, French grapes began to appear during the second half of the 19th Century with the objective of replacing the old grapes brought by Spanish Conquistadors, such as Pais, Carignan and Cinsault. Among them, there was Cabernet Sauvignon imported from Bordeaux by aristocrats such as Silvestre de Ochagavía, José Tomás Urmenta and Melchor de Concha y Toro.

Today, Cabernet Sauvignon is the most cultivated grape variety in Chile with over 40,000 hectares and representing almost a third of Chilean vineyards. Although it is planted from north to south, it has found its place of preference in the Maipo Valley, south of Santiago, at the foothills of the Andes.

Gandolini Las 3 Marías Vineyards
Cabernet Sauvignon

Descorchados

Best red wine and best Cabernet Sauvignon in Chile.

“Stefano Gandolini kept this close to the chest. He began working on the project in 2001, when he planted a vineyard in the area of Buin, in Alto Maipo. In the cool year of 2011, the vineyard —dedicated exclusively to Cabernet Sauvignon— has produced a wine that is typical of the Andean Maipo area: those herbal aromas, red fruits, menthol notes, that delicate structure that still exhibits strong and intense tannins, as well as a refreshing, sharp acidity. A Cabernet Sauvignon that is not only excellent, but also a classic example of a sense of place. A wine that couldn’t have been made anywhere else.”

James Suckling

“This is a fantastic red with blackberry, currant and fresh roses. Full body, silky tannins and a glorious finish. Goes for minutes. Opening now. Drink in 2020”.

Robert Parker

“The 2011 Las 3 Marías Vineyards, from a very low-yielding vineyard (one kilo per plant) aged for 21 months in new oak French barrels, is a pure Cabernet Sauvignon with very ripe notes of blackberries, cassis, graphite, subtle mint, sweet spices and black pepper. The tannins are abundant and fine-grained, but the palate is extremely balanced, built for the long haul, a ripe, elegant Cabernet Sauvignon”.

Jamie Goode

“This reminds me of a really good Coonawarra Cabernet Sauvignon. There’s just a hint of mint and cedar spice on the nose, as well as restrained, savoury-edged blackcurrant fruit. The palate is focused and fresh with great balance and concentration, lovely restrained blackcurrant fruit and a minerally, savoury core. The oak (21 months in French oak barrels) is well integrated and the hallmark of this wine is exceptional balance”.

Tim Atkin MW

“This impressive Chilean Cabernet Sauvignon comes from the foothills of the Andes rather than the flatter expanses of the Maipo Valley and it shows in the quality and definition of the wine. It’s a dense, compact, ageworthy red with rich flavours of plum, cassis and blackberry, sweet, toasty oak, structured tannins and excellent concentration. Built to last, it should develop further complexity over the next five to eight years”.

BevMo!

Cabernet Sauvignon Soil:

The soil needs special conditions to control the vine’s vigor:

I.

Deep subsoil so roots can explore a wider area looking for enough water during dry periods.

II.

Good drainage and porosity for the aeration of the roots.

III.

Soil with poor fertility, with low quantities of organic materials and nutrients to control the vine’s vigor and thus obtaining small clusters with highly concentrated berries and thicker skin.

IV.

Hot soils so that the bud breaks at the right time and clusters can mature appropriately (Cabernet Sauvignon vines are the last to be harvested).

“Wines are unique whenever
are in unique locations.”